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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor organisational change management

    Poor organisational change management refers to organisational change management that is poorly planned, communicated, supported or managed.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Harassment including sexual harassment

    Harassment includes offensive remarks or behaviour directed towards a worker or group of workers in relation to personal characteristics such as age, disability, race, sex, relationship status, family responsibilities, sexual orientation, gender identity, or intersex status.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Walk-behind milling machines and floor grinders

    Using walk-behind milling machines or floor grinders on concrete or other silica-containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Ebolavirus disease (EVD)

    The risk of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in Australia is low, however healthcare agencies are currently developing EVD preparedness plans to ensure that any potential cases can be managed safely. For more information on EVD, visit the Department of Health.

  • Electricity

    Electrical product recalls

    If an electrical product is shown to be unsafe and likely to cause injury or damage property, it should be recalled as soon as possible.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Vehicle-mounted drilling rigs for rock and concrete

    Using drilling rigs mounted on trucks, crawlers or other vehicles to drill into rock or concrete can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; electricity; environment; health and wellbeing; hazardous manual tasks; material; mental health; plant, equipment and vehicle

    Storms and floods

    It's important for employers and workers to be prepared for the threat of a natural disaster. This page has important health and safety information about what to do before, during and after a natural disaster strikes.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Heavy equipment and utility vehicles for demo activities

    Using heavy equipment and utility vehicles for tasks such as demolishing, abrading, or fracturing silica-containing materials such as brick, block, and concrete can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Large drivable milling machines (half lane and larger)

    Using large drivable milling machines (half lane and larger) on asphalt pavement, concrete, and other silica-containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Small drivable milling machines (less than half lane)

    Using small drivable milling machines (less than half lane) on asphalt pavement, concrete and other silica- containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld grinders for tasks other than mortar removal

    Using handheld grinders to smooth or cut the surfaces of concrete, masonry or other silica containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Occupational viral hepatitis

    Some workers are at increased risk of exposure to hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C viruses. Watch this short film from Hepatitis Queensland to find out more about who is at risk, how to protect against infection and where to get more information about viral hepatitis.