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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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All hazards

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  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Bullying

    Work-related bullying in your place of work can affect your workers’ psychological and physical health and must be managed.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld power saws

    Using a handheld power saw (also called a cut-off saw or quick cut) to cut masonry, concrete, stone or other silica-containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Heat stress

    Working in hot and/or humid environments can be uncomfortable, but more importantly lead to a heat-related illness, which can be fatal. This page has information about the causes and sources of heat stress, types of heat-related illness and control measures.

  • Health and wellbeing

    Healthy workers survey

    Use this survey to create a profile of your workforce’s health and wellbeing status.

  • Health and wellbeing

    Alcohol and other drugs

    Alcohol and other drugs can affect a person’s health and ability to work safely.

  • Hazardous chemicals; electricity; environment; health and wellbeing; material; plant, equipment and vehicle

    Children in workplaces

    Hazards to children in places of work carry the risk of injury, illness, or death. Workers and management can work together to reduce these risks.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor support

    Poor support refers to tasks or jobs where workers have inadequate emotional and/or practical support from their supervisors and/or co-workers, inadequate training or information to support their work performance, or inadequate tools, equipment or resources to do their job.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Core saws or drills

    Using a core saw or drill (including rig-mounted and handheld core drilling) can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Biological hazards

    Biological hazards can cause risks to workers in a number of ways. This page has information about a range of biological hazards including bacterial and viral hazards and diseases from animals.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Stationary masonry saws

    Using a stationary masonry saw to cut bricks, concrete blocks, pavers, tiles or other silica containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Traumatic events

    Workers may be exposed to this hazard at work through investigating, witnessing, or being directly exposed to traumatic events or situations. This may include reading, hearing or seeing accounts of traumatic events. A person is more likely to experience an event as traumatic when it is unexpected, is perceived as uncontrollable, where there is a threat to life or safety or where it is the result of intentional cruelty.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Airborne contaminants

    Workplace air can be contaminated by a range of airborne contaminants that are hazardous when breathed in.