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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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Showing 61-72 of 117 results with 2 filters

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  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Compressed air and blowers

    Using compressed air or blowers can make respirable crystalline silica dust that has settled become airborne. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Biological hazards

    Biological hazards can cause risks to workers in a number of ways. This page has information about a range of biological hazards including bacterial and viral hazards and diseases from animals.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Walk-behind saws

    Using a walk-behind saw to cut masonry, concrete, stone or other silica-containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Ebolavirus disease (EVD)

    The risk of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in Australia is low, however healthcare agencies are currently developing EVD preparedness plans to ensure that any potential cases can be managed safely. For more information on EVD, visit the Department of Health.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld power saws

    Using a handheld power saw (also called a cut-off saw or quick cut) to cut masonry, concrete, stone or other silica-containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Stationary masonry saws

    Using a stationary masonry saw to cut bricks, concrete blocks, pavers, tiles or other silica containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; electricity; environment; health and wellbeing; mental health

    Casual workers

    Casual workers can be employed directly by an employer or via a labour hire agency. In general terms, you should treat every casual worker as if they were one of your full-time workers.

  • Hazardous manual tasks; health and wellbeing

    Safer palletising

    Loading and unloading pallets of goods or produce are repetitive tasks that can easily lead to serious injury if the risks aren't removed.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Occupational viral hepatitis

    Some workers are at increased risk of exposure to hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C viruses. Watch this short film from Hepatitis Queensland to find out more about who is at risk, how to protect against infection and where to get more information about viral hepatitis.

  • Environment

    Housekeeping

    Many slips and trips are the results of poor housekeeping, and this is often a sign of a lack of clear systems and responsibilities for storage, maintenance and cleaning.

  • Hazardous manual tasks

    Sedentary work

    If you’re sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time without taking a break, it’s likely to have an impact on your health.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld and stand-mounted drills

    Handheld and stand-mounted drills, including impact and rotary hammer drills are used to drill holes in concrete, masonry and other silica-containing materials. This can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.