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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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Showing 85-96 of 118 results with 2 filters

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  • Hazardous chemicals; electricity; environment; health and wellbeing; material; plant, equipment and vehicle

    Children in workplaces

    Hazards to children in places of work carry the risk of injury, illness, or death. Workers and management can work together to reduce these risks.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld grinders for mortar removal

    Using handheld grinders to remove mortar (tuckpointing or removing mortar/concrete that has leaked from undersides of slab) can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Health and wellbeing

    Work health and wellbeing online learning course

    This interactive online learning course is aimed at managers, health and wellbeing coordinators, human resource staff and health and safety advisors. This course focuses on how to embed work health and wellbeing into business systems to improve the health of your workers and workplaces.

  • Environment; hazardous manual tasks; plant, equipment and vehicle

    Confined spaces

    Find out how to manage the health and safety risks associated with working in a confined space.

  • Health and wellbeing

    Supporting an ageing workforce

    Creating a healthy and safe place of work will support the health, safety and wellbeing of workers of all ages.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld grinders for tasks other than mortar removal

    Using handheld grinders to smooth or cut the surfaces of concrete, masonry or other silica containing materials can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Heavy equipment and utility vehicles for grading and excavating tasks

    Using heavy equipment and utility vehicles for earthmoving tasks such as grading and excavating does not usually generate hazardous levels of respirable crystalline silica dust.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor support

    Poor support refers to tasks or jobs where workers have inadequate emotional and/or practical support from their supervisors and/or co-workers, inadequate training or information to support their work performance, or inadequate tools, equipment or resources to do their job.

  • Environment

    Noise

    Hazardous noise can destroy the ability to hear clearly. It can also put workers at risk by affecting concentration or making it hard to hear the sounds necessary for working safely, such as instructions or warning signals.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Handheld power saws for cutting fibre-cement board with a blade diameter of 200mm or less

    Fibre-cement board is a composite material made from cement, sand and cellulose fibres. Using a handheld power saw to cut fibre-cement board can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled over time, the small particles of silica dust can irreversibly damage the lungs.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Airborne contaminants

    Workplace air can be contaminated by a range of airborne contaminants that are hazardous when breathed in.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Heavy equipment and utility vehicles for demo activities

    Using heavy equipment and utility vehicles for tasks such as demolishing, abrading, or fracturing silica-containing materials such as brick, block, and concrete can generate respirable crystalline silica dust. When inhaled, the small particles of silica can irreversibly damage the lungs.