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Quad safety under the spotlight

Quad bikes have long been popular vehicles for work and recreation, but they have been involved in a growing number of serious injuries and fatalities.

From 2014-2018, there were 129 vehicle-related fatalities in the agriculture industry, 29 (15%) of which were the result of a quad bike incident. This was second only to tractor incidents (44 fatalities).

Since 2011, there have been 150 quad bike fatalities in Australia, with around half being work-related. This year alone, 14 people across the country, including seven Queenslanders, have tragically lost their lives while riding a quad bike.

Workplace Health and Safety Queensland is committed to reducing quad bike incidents, and in 2016, the Statewide Plan for Improving Quad Bike Safety in Queensland was developed to highlight risks and enhance operator skills and safety. An integral part of the plan has been the Ride ready website and safety campaign focusing on wearing helmets, rider training, and keeping children and passengers off unsuitable vehicles.

It is important for rural operators to remember that children under 16 should not ride adult-sized quad bikes and all riders must wear compliant helmets. Children and other riders can use Ride ready to check their preparedness to use a quad bike.

The Ride ready campaign runs during school holidays and is complemented by annual market research to measure improvements in quad bike safety attitudes and to give insights into the long-term impact of WHSQ’s advisory, educational, and compliance work.

You can do your bit by completing a short survey and providing valuable input. Please submit your responses by Tuesday 13 October 2020.

All information you provide will be treated as confidential and will only be released in a manner that prevents individual identification. This survey is undertaken in accordance with the Australian Privacy Principles (2014).

Further information