Skip to content
Menu

Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

Filter by Industry
Industry
Filter by Hazard type
Hazard type
Selected filters

All hazards

Choose a sort order
  • Health and wellbeing

    Alcohol and other drugs

    Alcohol and other drugs can affect a person’s health and ability to work safely.

  • Mental health

    Violence and aggression

    Learn about your responsibilities and how to reduce work-related violence hazards.

  • Health and wellbeing

    Health and wellbeing

    The work people do can positively or negatively affect their health. There are many ways that organisations can improve their work processes to improve productivity and workers' health and to reduce chronic disease risks.

  • Environment

    Noise

    Hazardous noise can destroy the ability to hear clearly. It can also put workers at risk by affecting concentration or making it hard to hear the sounds necessary for working safely, such as instructions or warning signals.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor support

    Poor support refers to tasks or jobs where workers have inadequate emotional and/or practical support from their supervisors and/or co-workers, inadequate training or information to support their work performance, or inadequate tools, equipment or resources to do their job.

  • Hazardous chemicals

    Hazardous chemicals

    Hazardous chemicals are common in a wide variety of workplaces. Businesses must identify the hazards of all the hazardous chemicals onsite and safely manage their storage and handling and use.

  • Hazardous manual tasks

    Sedentary work

    If you’re sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time without taking a break, it’s likely to have an impact on your health.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Traumatic events

    Workers may be exposed to this hazard at work through investigating, witnessing, or being directly exposed to traumatic events or situations. This may include reading, hearing or seeing accounts of traumatic events. A person is more likely to experience an event as traumatic when it is unexpected, is perceived as uncontrollable, where there is a threat to life or safety or where it is the result of intentional cruelty.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Low job control

    Low job control refers to work in which workers have little or no control over what happens in their work environment, how or when their work is done, or the objectives they work towards.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Low role clarity

    Low role clarity refers to jobs where there is uncertainty about, or frequent changes to tasks and work standards; where important task information is not available to workers; or where there are conflicting job roles, responsibilities or expectations.

  • Mental health

    Fatigue

    Fatigue is more than feeling tired and drowsy. At work, fatigue is a state of mental and/or physical exhaustion that reduces your ability to work safely and effectively.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Bullying

    Work-related bullying in your place of work can affect your workers’ psychological and physical health and must be managed.