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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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Showing 1-12 of 49 results with 2 filters

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  • Hazardous chemicals

    Pool chemical retailers

    There is a range of hazards associated with the storing and handling pool chemicals in the retail sector.

  • Hazardous chemicals

    Laboratories

    Laboratories are unique in that they often have relatively small quantities, but many different hazardous chemicals. This presents unique safety management challenges.

  • Environment; material

    Lyngbya

    Exposure to Lyngbya majuscula (lyngbya), a naturally occurring, toxic, blue-green algae, can cause severe irritation to the eyes, skin, respiratory system or gastrointestinal system.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Events (short-term fuel storage)

    Special events are often attended by many people and may be located in densely-populated areas so it is essential to manage risks from hazardous chemicals.

  • Environment; material

    Latex allergy

    While latex products like disposable latex gloves help protect workers from infection, they can cause irritant or allergic reactions in some people. Find out how to manage these risks.

  • Environment; material

    Melioidosis

    Working with soil and surface water, especially after high rainfall, can expose workers to melioidosis.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Q fever

    Q fever is an infectious disease that is spread from animals to people. It is caused by bacteria called Coxiella burnetii.

  • Plant, equipment and vehicle

    On-site traffic management

    You must manage the risk of collision and injuries when vehicles and powered mobile machinery and equipment operate in the same area as pedestrians.

  • Environment

    Bushfire smoke

    Ongoing bushfire activity can decrease air quality and may affect the health of all workers, not just those involved in fighting fires.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Hazardous dusts

    All airborne dust is hazardous to health. Dust can contain a range of materials including sand, dirt, pollen, minerals, wood, micro-organisms, and vehicle and industrial exhausts.

  • Mental health

    Mental health

    Psychological health and safety is about protecting the psychological health of workers, in the same way that we protect their physical health. Find out how you can play an active role in ensuring the psychological health and safety of workers.

  • Electricity

    Electricity

    Electricity can kill if you give it the chance. Learn about your legal obligations and the steps you can take to stay safe when working around electricity.