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Hazards index

Hazards are anything that can cause harm and every place of work has them. Understanding the hazards at your work can help you manage risks and keep workers safe and healthy.

This information will help you identify the hazards at your work and the steps you can take to reduce or remove risks for yourself and your workers.

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Showing 73-84 of 95 results with 2 filters

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  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Low job control

    Low job control refers to work in which workers have little or no control over what happens in their work environment, how or when their work is done, or the objectives they work towards.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Low role clarity

    Low role clarity refers to jobs where there is uncertainty about, or frequent changes to tasks and work standards; where important task information is not available to workers; or where there are conflicting job roles, responsibilities or expectations.

  • Mental health

    Violence and aggression

    Learn about your responsibilities and how to reduce work-related violence hazards.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Skin infections at work

    Skin infections are caused by germs, including some types of bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Skin infections can affect anyone, but some types of work have an increased risk.

  • Hazardous chemicals; environment; material

    Airborne contaminants

    Workplace air can be contaminated by a range of airborne contaminants that are hazardous when breathed in.

  • Electricity; environment; health and wellbeing; hazardous manual tasks; plant, equipment and vehicle

    Lighting

    How to reduce the risks associated with insufficient lighting in workplaces.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Traumatic events

    Workers may be exposed to this hazard at work through investigating, witnessing, or being directly exposed to traumatic events or situations. This may include reading, hearing or seeing accounts of traumatic events. A person is more likely to experience an event as traumatic when it is unexpected, is perceived as uncontrollable, where there is a threat to life or safety or where it is the result of intentional cruelty.

  • Environment; health and wellbeing

    Managing mould

    Mould is a type of fungus that is found everywhere, outdoors and indoors. However, exposure to mould can cause health and safety issues. Find out how to manage mould and stay safe.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor organisational change management

    Poor organisational change management refers to organisational change management that is poorly planned, communicated, supported or managed.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor environmental conditions

    Poor environmental conditions are those where workers are exposed to unpleasant, poor quality, or hazardous physical environments or conditions that create a stress response.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Low reward and recognition

    Low reward and recognition refers to work where there is an imbalance between workers’ efforts and recognition or rewards they receive in return – both formal and informal.

  • Health and wellbeing; mental health

    Poor organisational justice

    Poor organisational justice refers to work where there is a lack of procedural fairness (fair processes to reach decisions), informational fairness (keeping relevant people informed), or interpersonal fairness (treating people with dignity and respect).